Lightning Strikes, Be Ready

Salesforce will turn on Lightning Experience on a rolling basis starting with the Winter ‘20 release for all orgs with Supported Editions and User Licenses for Lightning Experience.

After the update, users will still have access to Salesforce Classic when Lightning Experience is turned on, however for a limited time. Currently, users may take advantage of the built-in lead time to get used to the formal change coming next year, by selecting the Turn on Lightning Experience update that appears under Critical Updates.

Utilize this action to verify your organization’s existing features and customizations in the new interface and to prepare your users via change management. Start now to ensure a better experience for everyone when Lightning Experience is turned on later. Every week, starting the Sunday after Lightning Experience is turned on, Lightning Experience-enabled users who are working in Salesforce Classic are automatically logged into Lightning Experience. Users can switch back to Salesforce Classic as needed, but again, for a limited time.


WHAT’S THE TIMELINE FOR THIS UPDATE?

Beginning in Winter ‘20, the update starts to auto-activates. See the auto-activation date listed under Critical Updates for your organization’s specific auto-activation date.

WHICH EDITIONS AND USERS ARE AFFECTED?

All users with the Lightning Experience User permission enabled are affected by this critical update. This includes all users with: (1) Standard profiles, which automatically include the Lightning Experience User permission by default and (2) Custom profiles or permission sets that have the Lightning Experience User permission included.

Set Up Users for Lightning Experience

HOW CAN YOU PREPARE FOR THE UPDATE?

Salesforce offers excellent transition tools that automate and speed up the process. The Lightning Experience Transition Assistant is a one-stop shop for all of the recommended steps and tools that you need; but of course, DaizyLogik is available to assist clients as well.LexNov2019TipsDaizyLogik has done several upgrades to Lightning now, and depending on the timing of the move and the level of customization in the Salesforce instance, the level of effort has been between do-it-yourself to “you need a developer”.

Salesforce has continually improved the automatic inventory of artifacts that need special attention during a Lightning conversion, also known as the Readiness Check. The Lightning Experience Migration Assistant has been replaced by the Lightning Experience Transition Assistant, your central hub for all of the recommended activities, tools, and resources for a successful transition. There are now Beta versions of tools to inventory and convert JavaScript buttons, Visualforce pages, and URL hacks.

Some of the artifacts can be converted automatically by Salesforce, but for those more complicated cases that the tools cannot convert, you will need a consultant and possibly a developer to build the equivalent button, link or page navigation in Lightning.

Specifically, we want to show how we leveraged the power of Lightning Components to solve some of the more complicated cases we ran across.

Salesforce CRM, the ‘PATH’ to Global Engagement

For many nonprofits fundraising is not just a means of raising critical funds, but also a way to promote the message and goals of a charity. Given enough time and capital, a charity has the potential to go global with engagement, ensuring the organization can continue support its cause; for example, funding research. What can get in the way of potential lifechanging funding? Operations that aren’t consistently streamlined. This is where Salesforce can be a powerful tool in constituent management; with more importantly, the right training.

Salesforce has earned its place as one of the most comprehensive CRM software options on the market. A popular solution for for-profit businesses, many nonprofits tend to fall into the belief that because of their specific needs, it may not be the right fit – fortunately, that’s not true! Salesforce.org Nonprofit Cloud is the only complete platform for nonprofits. It’s the only platform that gives you a 360-degree view of an organization’s mission, and is the only platform built with a community of over 30,000 trailblazers. Its program allows users to deepen constituent relationships, deliver better programs, and accelerate its transformation into a connected nonprofit. A great example of its possibilities was established by DaizyLogik client, PATH, and case study: Understand Your Stakeholders: A Case Study in Agile Salesforce CRM Planning; specifically with client lead, Catherine Endicott. Catherine came into the project with no prior Salesforce CRM experience, but as an experienced fundraising professional. Our team worked alongside her and the PATH team throughout the project to drive the migration of the organization fundraising data and processes from Donor Perfect Online to Salesforce CRM.

Now, two years later, Catherine has not only grown more confident in her use of Salesforce CRM but, has started helping others in the community by sharing some of the practices that our team helped put in place at PATH. Don’t just take our word for it though, please allow Catherine to explain herself in our recent customer review, below.

Where Is The Project? – Salesforce CRM For The Long Haul

Whether you are a nonprofit Salesforce CRM administrator struggling with the decision of when and how to bring in a Salesforce consultant to help your team overcome the complexities of the CRM or you are a consultant evaluating a Salesforce CRM engagement, you have probably given a lot of thought to what makes your work a project.

In the world of Salesforce CRM consulting it’s often expected and required to define and secure projects, work on projects, talk about projects and be rated and evaluated on the success of projects.

But what about the other work we do with our clients that falls outside the box of a “project”? This blog is about shining a spotlight on the non-project work we do day in and day out in partnership with our clients.  

HomeKeeper – A Fieldset Container Lightning Component

Problem Description

DaizyLogik and Grounded Solutions Network were working on making the HomeKeeper app managed package Lightning compatible. The primary custom object in HomeKeeper has nearly 300 fields on its package page layout, a common design in Salesforce Classic for complex objects that allows users to view related fields of a record on one page via formula fields.

One limitation when using Lightning experience is that a maximum of 254 fields can be displayed on a page layout or Lightning page. For an object with more than 254 fields, not all fields can be added to a Lightning layout to be displayed all at once, which means an administrator needs to be selective as to which fields will be shown. Currently, the available workarounds are:

  • Use Salesforce Classic
  • Remove fields from the layout so fewer than 254 fields are displayed at one time
  • Find a Lightning component on the AppExchange that can display fields from an object and ‘break up’ the page in multiple parts. This particular workaround would not work in our case, because of the need to package such a component with the HomeKeeper App, which is not possible.

Adding CAPTCHA to Volunteers for Salesforce Sign Up Form

Nonprofits love when volunteers sign up and engage with the organization. When using Volunteers for Salesforce this is accomplished through the sign up form that allows sign ups to flow from the online form directly into Salesforce. It is therefore important to protect the quality of the incoming data and make sure it is humans signing up and not bots.

This article will show how to enhance the Volunteers for Salesforce Signup page with CAPTCHA using very little customization.

Please keep in mind that the Volunteers for Salesforce Sign Up page is part of the managed package Volunteers for Salesforce so in order to add the CAPTCHA some coding will be needed.

Process Improvements with Custom Development and Integration

rentonOur DaizyLogik team has a long history of working with local government agencies to support them in upgrading their systems and evolving their technology to adjust to changing demands. We were thrilled to support the City of Renton, Washington, as they sought to adopt and customize the Business and Occupation Tax system, a service oriented, extensible and modular system built on the Microsoft .NET framework and powered by SQL Server. The system supports critical business processes for local city agencies and integrates with external systems via web services.

The goals of this project were: to implement and customize the Business and Occupation Tax software package in accordance to the City of Renton’s specific requirements and tax rules, integrate it with FileLocal’s web-based tax filing portal and the city’s GIS system.

Read More about how this project contributed to the digital transformation of a local agency.

Addressing Salesforce CRM Storage Limitations – A Document-Oriented Database Inspired Approach

Most organizations start out with 1GB of storage for Salesforce CRM. This can be a challenge especially for nonprofits who would like to collect a lot of data needed to report to their funders,  collect program data or consolidate multiple aspects of their business data into Salesforce. Over time the data fills up the allotted storage and puts organizations into a bind to either purge data or purchase more storage.

Over the years we have explored different solutions that can be used as preventive measures and limit the storage used. The traditional approach is to either export and archive or aggregate and purge older records. The drawback with these solutions is that you can no longer see the details of the historical data in Salesforce.

Below we describe a different preventive approach inspired from document-oriented databases that allows organizations to keep their data and not run the risk of running out of storage.

Share your Salesforce Data with Your Constituents

At DaizyLogik we always strive to serve our clients through a thoughtful approach in which we take the coolest solutions we develop and make then widely available to as many organizations as possible. Nonprofits work hard to make the world a better place, and they deserve to have access to these solutions in a streamlined and cost effective way. So when our consultants see patterns emerge from client requests, our team of developers transform these ideas into useful products and services. We share a few examples here.

The Salesforce Data Story

Over the years, we’ve found that many organizations want to publicly share some of the important data they collect in Salesforce on their website. The most common ways to do this come with their own set of challenges:

  • Exporting a snapshot of the data from Salesforce, and hard-coding it in the website. This requires manual process and results in static website content.
  • Exposing Visualforce pages through sites requires custom Salesforce development which can be expensive and difficult for web developers to style in a public website.
  • Using Salesforce Communities which comes with a steep price tag.

We knew there had to be a more streamlined way to make this work. Our team wanted solutions that would not require us to reinvent the wheel every time a client asks, that does not clutter Salesforce with custom code, and that can scale to benefit multiple clients. So we built them!

Which flow would that be?

If you’ve ever run into or received this error message from Salesforce you know how frustrating it can be to not know right away which flow this is referring to.

The record couldn’t be saved because it failed to trigger a flow. A flow trigger failed to execute the flow with version ID 301A0000000TizV. Flow error messages: <b>An unhandled fault has occurred in this flow</b>An unhandled fault has occurred while processing the flow. Please contact your system administrator for more information. Contact your administrator for help.

 

Here is one way to find out which flow this is referring to. Open the Developer Console and navigate to Query Editor. Type the following query, plugging in the id from the error message:

select masterlabel from flow where id = '301A..........V'

Make sure you check the “Use Tooling API” checkbox at the left bottom of the screen. Click Execute. This will return the label for the flow or process builder. Voila!

One Report, Many Dashboard Components

Do you have a favorite Salesforce report that provides you a wealth of data that you would like to represent visually? If your report is pulling together multiple sums and groupings, then one graphical representation will not be possible or desirable. But with a Dashboard in Salesforce Lightning, you can leverage the same report to show many aspects of your data in one place.

We used two of our favorite reports “New Donors Last Year” and “Second Year Donors”. These reports pull the list of gifts made last year by new and returning donors, grouped by donation Record Type and by donor, and count the number of donors as well as the number of donations.

We then used the two reports to create a rich Lightning Dashboard that visually displays various aspects of the data.

LightningDashboardBlog

Each of the two reports was reused multiple times to extract and display different aspects of the data using the right visual representation in dashboard components. The New Donors Last Year is used to display the four dashboard components in the top row, while the Second Year Donors report was used to create the four components in the bottom row.

When adding a new Dashboard component in Lightning you can select the report you wish to use, the visual representation and the actual slice of data from the report. LightningDashboardComponent2

By reusing the same report for multiple components you can avoid the proliferation of multiple versions of the same report, and you can easily call out various aspects of the data by visually representing them in a dashboard.