HomeKeeper – A Fieldset Container Lightning Component

Problem Description

DaizyLogik and Grounded Solutions Network were working on making the HomeKeeper app managed package Lightning compatible. The primary custom object in HomeKeeper has nearly 300 fields on its package page layout, a common design in Salesforce Classic for complex objects that allows users to view related fields of a record on one page via formula fields.

One limitation when using Lightning experience is that a maximum of 254 fields can be displayed on a page layout or Lightning page. For an object with more than 254 fields, not all fields can be added to a Lightning layout to be displayed all at once, which means an administrator needs to be selective as to which fields will be shown. Currently, the available workarounds are:

  • Use Salesforce Classic
  • Remove fields from the layout so fewer than 254 fields are displayed at one time
  • Find a Lightning component on the AppExchange that can display fields from an object and ‘break up’ the page in multiple parts. This particular workaround would not work in our case, because of the need to package such a component with the HomeKeeper App, which is not possible.

Adding CAPTCHA to Volunteers for Salesforce Sign Up Form

Nonprofits love when volunteers sign up and engage with the organization. When using Volunteers for Salesforce this is accomplished through the sign up form that allows sign ups to flow from the online form directly into Salesforce. It is therefore important to protect the quality of the incoming data and make sure it is humans signing up and not bots.

This article will show how to enhance the Volunteers for Salesforce Signup page with CAPTCHA using very little customization.

Please keep in mind that the Volunteers for Salesforce Sign Up page is part of the managed package Volunteers for Salesforce so in order to add the CAPTCHA some coding will be needed.

Building A Teacher Portal Using Salesforce Communities for ArtsCorps

ArtsCorpsArtsCorps works with a growing number of teaching artists and other teaching professionals who need to track and submit student attendance as well as payroll information.They had designed a functional solution, but after a number of years, the team realized that it was not a solution that could scale to accommodate the need for a growing number of teaching artists to submit attendance tracking data, timesheets, and expenses.

The ArtsCorps team reached out to DaizyLogik to propose alternative solutions that would allow teaching artists to manage and enter attendance for their classes, timesheets, and expense information through a self-serve online portal. After exploring several options, DaizyLogik recommended using Salesforce Customer Communities to build the teacher portal that would put the ability to manage class information, student attendance, and payroll information in the hands of teachers.

Read more about how this customized solution helped ArtsCorps by designing a simple, self-serve system to support their team.

Addressing Salesforce CRM Storage Limitations – A Document-Oriented Database Inspired Approach

Most organizations start out with 1GB of storage for Salesforce CRM. This can be a challenge especially for nonprofits who would like to collect a lot of data needed to report to their funders,  collect program data or consolidate multiple aspects of their business data into Salesforce. Over time the data fills up the allotted storage and puts organizations into a bind to either purge data or purchase more storage.

Over the years we have explored different solutions that can be used as preventive measures and limit the storage used. The traditional approach is to either export and archive or aggregate and purge older records. The drawback with these solutions is that you can no longer see the details of the historical data in Salesforce.

Below we describe a different preventive approach inspired from document-oriented databases that allows organizations to keep their data and not run the risk of running out of storage.

Which flow would that be?

If you’ve ever run into or received this error message from Salesforce you know how frustrating it can be to not know right away which flow this is referring to.

The record couldn’t be saved because it failed to trigger a flow. A flow trigger failed to execute the flow with version ID 301A0000000TizV. Flow error messages: <b>An unhandled fault has occurred in this flow</b>An unhandled fault has occurred while processing the flow. Please contact your system administrator for more information. Contact your administrator for help.

 

Here is one way to find out which flow this is referring to. Open the Developer Console and navigate to Query Editor. Type the following query, plugging in the id from the error message:

select masterlabel from flow where id = '301A..........V'

Make sure you check the “Use Tooling API” checkbox at the left bottom of the screen. Click Execute. This will return the label for the flow or process builder. Voila!

0 comments on “Contributing to an Open Source Salesforce Managed Package”

Contributing to an Open Source Salesforce Managed Package

Use Case: Volunteers for Salesforce

Some Salesforce managed packages provide developers in the community the opportunity to contribute with code and features. Packages such as the Non Profit Starter Pack or Volunteers for Salesforce are open source software, which means developers can contribute to the code on GitHub (https://github.com/) resulting into new features or improvements to the software. These features are then packaged into the managed version being upgraded.

University of New Hampshire engaged Daizy Logik to develop several enhancements to Volunteers for Salesforce that were then incorporated back into the package. Based on this work we developed this step-by-step technical guide on how to successfully contribute to an open source Salesforce managed package. The process described here uses Volunteers for Salesforce as an example but could be more generally applied to any open source managed package.

Development Environment Setup

To facilitate the setup of your development environment we recommend using these freely available utilities that should be available on both Mac and PC. 

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Salesforce Push Upgrade – How To

Creating a Patch for a Managed Package and Doing a Push Upgrade

Posted by Nineta Martinov

Recently I had to create a Patch for one of my clients’ managed package in order to make a minor change and push it out to all the client organizations using the package. For the most part the Salesforce documentation is fairly accurate in guiding one through the process. However, I could not find any help with screenshots documenting the end-to-end process so I put this together.

Remember that a Patch should only be created if no new components are being added to the managed package. For example, if you want to change the wording in a Visualforce page you would want to use a Patch.

Step1. Log into the main development org. This is where you developed the managed package. Go to Create -> Packages and click on the Managed package name.

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Interact with Salesforce Data through a Drag and Drop Interface

Salesforce Data can be exposed to the end users via Visualforce pages. The responsiveness and interactivity of the UI can be enhanced with a javascript framework such as jQuery.

The data I am representing here consists of Projects and Teams. Projects have a Start Date and End Date, and can be assigned to a Team. The structure and data look like this:
erdteam

project

Using a Visualforce page enhanced with jQuery and leveraging the gridster.js grid, we can create a more intuitive UI, as shown below:

0 comments on “Should I use Process Builder or write Apex code?”

Should I use Process Builder or write Apex code?

If you have asked yourself this question recently here are some tips that can help you decide which path you should take. Imagine you have to implement the following scenario:

Use Case:  Users are signing up online and filling out a form. They have to provide contact information for 4 additional Contacts at their organizations. For each additional Contact they will enter a First Name, Last Name, Email, Phone and Role. All this information will be automatically fed to Salesforce in the form of an online subscription record.

For each additional Contact you are required to first determine if it exists in Salesforce and if not then create it. If you find the contact in Salesforce (based on Last Name and Email) then you have to update the Phone, set the mailing address and create an Affiliation to the Account/Organization with the specified role.

(Please note that this use case uses Affiliations which are a custom object specific to the SF Non Profit Starter Pack. An Affiliation is a junction object between a Contact and an Account.)

The PROCESS BUILDER AND FLOW ROUTE

It is possible to go the process builder route for this one.

1 comment on “When Do You Need a Developer for a Migration to Salesforce?”

When Do You Need a Developer for a Migration to Salesforce?

In many instances, the data to be migrated in Salesforce is simple enough that it can be imported with a tool like Jitterbit or the Salesforce Data Import Wizard.

There are some situations though, when the migration might be difficult or cumbersome to implement with one of these tools. It’s likely that in these cases developing an application will be more cost-effective than the standard approach.

Here are a few cases when a Salesforce developer should create an application to process the data import by using Visualforce and Apex: