Where Is The Project? – Salesforce CRM For The Long Haul

Whether you are a nonprofit Salesforce CRM administrator struggling with the decision of when and how to bring in a Salesforce consultant to help your team overcome the complexities of the CRM or you are a consultant evaluating a Salesforce CRM engagement, you have probably given a lot of thought to what makes your work a project.

In the world of Salesforce CRM consulting it’s often expected and required to define and secure projects, work on projects, talk about projects and be rated and evaluated on the success of projects.

But what about the other work we do with our clients that falls outside the box of a “project”? This blog is about shining a spotlight on the non-project work we do day in and day out in partnership with our clients.  

Business Processes Change. Your Salesforce CRM Should Change With Them.

Does your Salesforce CRM feel disconnected from your business processes? Do you feel like you have to use Salesforce because is telling you to, but you end up reverting to spreadsheets and sticky notes?

As Salesforce has been gaining momentum in the nonprofit community, many nonprofits adopt and implement the powerful CRM to manage their donor engagement and programs. Through our work with nonprofits at various stages in their journey with Salesforce, we have found that while their business processes may change and evolve to meet new demands, their CRM doesn’t always keep up.

Fortunately, there are a few telltale signs that indicate that an organization is using a CRM that no longer supports their business processes. If you see your staff seeking out alternatives to Salesforce, it may be time to schedule a business process review.

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The Power of a Phased Approach: Implementing the Nonprofit Success Pack in an Existing Salesforce Instance

PATH hired DaizyLogik to help them improve user buy-in within the Global Engagement division and incorporate Salesforce as a true CRM for the department.

This case study offers insights into how the DaizyLogik team led the effort to implement the Nonprofit Success Pack (NPSP) on an existing Salesforce database for PATH by using a phased approach.

This body of work started with the output from the CRM planning phase, which we discussed in Part 1 of this Case Study (Understand Your Stakeholders: A Case Study in Agile Salesforce CRM Planning). This work included over 900 user stories that were groomed and prioritized, an existing Salesforce instance with approximately 700 active users, 1.5GB of data to be migrated from DonorPerfect into NPSP, and integration with external applications such as DonorSearch and SoapBox Engage.

Recognizing the scale of this project, our team started by defining a few phases of implementation, each with its own theme and set of goals.

Read the full case study here.

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Are You Recruiting a Salesforce Consultant or a Roofer?

Daizy Logik: Creativity. Rigor.

When recruiting a Salesforce CRM consultant, it’s very tempting for project managers in organizations to equate this individual with the contractors they’ve hired to do other jobs, such as installing a new roof. After all, both the Salesforce consultant and the roofer require a very specific skill set to do their jobs well, take on a certain set of risks, and probably cost more than one might originally expect.

Salesforce consultants know the feeling all too well that their bids and proposals are reviewed as if they were simply quotes for a new roof. And it sounds fair on the surface, if you believe that Salesforce consulting equals a one-off home repair project.

If you’re in the shoes of an organization evaluating a consulting proposal for your Salesforce CRM and find yourself struggling with the question of how to evaluate consultants, consider the following points.