Lightning Strikes, Be Ready

Salesforce will turn on Lightning Experience on a rolling basis starting with the Winter ‘20 release for all orgs with Supported Editions and User Licenses for Lightning Experience.

After the update, users will still have access to Salesforce Classic when Lightning Experience is turned on, however for a limited time. Currently, users may take advantage of the built-in lead time to get used to the formal change coming next year, by selecting the Turn on Lightning Experience update that appears under Critical Updates.

Utilize this action to verify your organization’s existing features and customizations in the new interface and to prepare your users via change management. Start now to ensure a better experience for everyone when Lightning Experience is turned on later. Every week, starting the Sunday after Lightning Experience is turned on, Lightning Experience-enabled users who are working in Salesforce Classic are automatically logged into Lightning Experience. Users can switch back to Salesforce Classic as needed, but again, for a limited time.


WHAT’S THE TIMELINE FOR THIS UPDATE?

Beginning in Winter ‘20, the update starts to auto-activates. See the auto-activation date listed under Critical Updates for your organization’s specific auto-activation date.

WHICH EDITIONS AND USERS ARE AFFECTED?

All users with the Lightning Experience User permission enabled are affected by this critical update. This includes all users with: (1) Standard profiles, which automatically include the Lightning Experience User permission by default and (2) Custom profiles or permission sets that have the Lightning Experience User permission included.

Set Up Users for Lightning Experience

HOW CAN YOU PREPARE FOR THE UPDATE?

Salesforce offers excellent transition tools that automate and speed up the process. The Lightning Experience Transition Assistant is a one-stop shop for all of the recommended steps and tools that you need; but of course, DaizyLogik is available to assist clients as well.LexNov2019TipsDaizyLogik has done several upgrades to Lightning now, and depending on the timing of the move and the level of customization in the Salesforce instance, the level of effort has been between do-it-yourself to “you need a developer”.

Salesforce has continually improved the automatic inventory of artifacts that need special attention during a Lightning conversion, also known as the Readiness Check. The Lightning Experience Migration Assistant has been replaced by the Lightning Experience Transition Assistant, your central hub for all of the recommended activities, tools, and resources for a successful transition. There are now Beta versions of tools to inventory and convert JavaScript buttons, Visualforce pages, and URL hacks.

Some of the artifacts can be converted automatically by Salesforce, but for those more complicated cases that the tools cannot convert, you will need a consultant and possibly a developer to build the equivalent button, link or page navigation in Lightning.

Specifically, we want to show how we leveraged the power of Lightning Components to solve some of the more complicated cases we ran across.

Where Is The Project? – Salesforce CRM For The Long Haul

Whether you are a nonprofit Salesforce CRM administrator struggling with the decision of when and how to bring in a Salesforce consultant to help your team overcome the complexities of the CRM or you are a consultant evaluating a Salesforce CRM engagement, you have probably given a lot of thought to what makes your work a project.

In the world of Salesforce CRM consulting it’s often expected and required to define and secure projects, work on projects, talk about projects and be rated and evaluated on the success of projects.

But what about the other work we do with our clients that falls outside the box of a “project”? This blog is about shining a spotlight on the non-project work we do day in and day out in partnership with our clients.  

Building a Custom, Responsive, Client Intake Form in Salesforce NPSP

For many years, Bellingham Food Bank used a legacy Access database called “The Food Bank Intake Database” to track client intake information for the 300-600 households who use their services each day they’re open. This software allowed them to collect data for analysis of the services they provided to their clients, and to produce the monthly statistical reports required by various funders.

As time passed, and as the organization upgraded their various systems, the Access database did not upgrade along with it. The staff at Bellingham Food Bank recognized the mission critical nature of the database, and began to make plans to replace the aging system once it started to crash regularly. In order to process a household every 30-60 seconds, the team needed a system they could depend on.

The Bellingham Food Bank engaged DaizyLogik to design and develop a client intake application that leverages the features of Salesforce CRM and the Nonprofit Success Pack to provide a modern and mobile user interface.

Read the case study here.

 

A Use Case for FormAssembly to Salesforce Integration – Improved Efficiencies

Arts Corps has been using Salesforce and the Nonprofit Success Pack (NPSP) for a number of years. On their website, they hosted three web-to-lead forms, which would automatically drop new information directly into Salesforce as Leads. For many years, our team at DaizyLogik was able to maintain a legacy solution for the mass conversion of these leads

When this legacy lead conversion tool finally stopped functioning completely in November 2017, Arts Corps knew it had to make a choice about how to move forward.

Read the full case study.

One Report, Many Dashboard Components

Do you have a favorite Salesforce report that provides you a wealth of data that you would like to represent visually? If your report is pulling together multiple sums and groupings, then one graphical representation will not be possible or desirable. But with a Dashboard in Salesforce Lightning, you can leverage the same report to show many aspects of your data in one place.

We used two of our favorite reports “New Donors Last Year” and “Second Year Donors”. These reports pull the list of gifts made last year by new and returning donors, grouped by donation Record Type and by donor, and count the number of donors as well as the number of donations.

We then used the two reports to create a rich Lightning Dashboard that visually displays various aspects of the data.

LightningDashboardBlog

Each of the two reports was reused multiple times to extract and display different aspects of the data using the right visual representation in dashboard components. The New Donors Last Year is used to display the four dashboard components in the top row, while the Second Year Donors report was used to create the four components in the bottom row.

When adding a new Dashboard component in Lightning you can select the report you wish to use, the visual representation and the actual slice of data from the report. LightningDashboardComponent2

By reusing the same report for multiple components you can avoid the proliferation of multiple versions of the same report, and you can easily call out various aspects of the data by visually representing them in a dashboard.

The Drag-n-Drop Calendar: Interactive, Real-Time Event Management

EarthCorps coordinates 850 volunteer events, field projects, and workshops each year, and they must frequently update event details, dates, and teams as circumstances change. The process of updating the details for each event involved a number of time consuming steps.

This process was not particularly easy and team members complained that it took too much time. On top of that, users did not have a visual to reference while they were making changes to the calendar, which made it more difficult to keep track of things.

EarthCorps leadership wanted to make it easier for project teams to make updates to their events. They wanted to be able to take the visual image of an event on the Calendar and simply drag it to a new location within the same month, or to a new month, automatically updating the event’s information.

Read how we made this happen.

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Salesforce Push Upgrade – How To

Creating a Patch for a Managed Package and Doing a Push Upgrade

Posted by Nineta Martinov

Recently I had to create a Patch for one of my clients’ managed package in order to make a minor change and push it out to all the client organizations using the package. For the most part the Salesforce documentation is fairly accurate in guiding one through the process. However, I could not find any help with screenshots documenting the end-to-end process so I put this together.

Remember that a Patch should only be created if no new components are being added to the managed package. For example, if you want to change the wording in a Visualforce page you would want to use a Patch.

Step1. Log into the main development org. This is where you developed the managed package. Go to Create -> Packages and click on the Managed package name.

Successful Salesforce implementation with a distributed team

It is becoming more commonplace these days for the team doing the Salesforce implementation to not be physically co-located. In fact, it is very likely that your next Salesforce project will involve a physically distributed team. How can you adapt your project management, design, development and overall project communication style to deliver a project of this nature and be successful at it?

1. Communicate
It is crucial to pick tools that facilitate communication among the team members during regular project meetings and at all times during the course of the project. The choices for online communication tools are quite diverse these days but I find that the best criteria for choosing the right one are: audience and price.